****This giveaway is now closed. The winner will be announced soon!****

Oh my gosh, you guys. I have been giddy for, like, three days. Absolutely, annoyingly, anxious-happy. And it’s over a little bitty named Roxanne. I managed to use a sewing pattern all by myself and it turned out wearable, one might even say, darling? My new favorite pattern company, hands down, is Victory Patterns.

Roxanne by Victory Patterns made from thrifted fabric

I swear the pointer finger claw comes out in 90% of my photos.

I bought this e-pattern over Christmas break after perusing some online patterns with my mother. I had about four yards of some awesome teal fabric that I had thrifted about a month earlier; a georgette, according to my mom. I cut out the pattern and read the beautifully designed instructions before starting. Not usually my thing. About four hours later the mutant death virus took over my body.

Those cut-out fabric pieces laid folded, alone, waiting to be assembled for nearly a month. In fact, I almost entirely forgot that I had a shirt to sew. Then I deemed last weekend and recuperate-and-sew weekend, and I stumbled upon the makings of my shirt. I set to work with that miraculous, not-at-all-like-me patience.

It was the pleats, friends. Those pleats captured my heart. The topstitch on that yoke? I couldn’t take a break without thinking constantly, without being totally obsessed, with finishing this shirt. True story, ask my friends, refer to my tweets.

It was finished. And then this happened. Envision angels singing, okay?

Roxanne top and beagleNow this pattern. It’s really something to write home about. There was not a single missed step. It was easy to understand and conscise. And never once did it make me feel totally inadequate. Most sewing patterns do that to me. Victory patterns are amazing. And there are two versions you can make!

roxanne both versionsSource

Roxanne by victory patterns meadow rue giveawayAnd guess what?! You can have one too! The sweetest Kristiann (the mastermind behind the patterns) has agreed to let me give one pdf version of The Roxanne pattern (a $9.95 value) to one of you. Just leave a lovely, little comment. The winner of this giveaway will be chosen at random and announced Monday, February 4th here on the blog.

Godspeed, good friends, godspeed.

Did I ever tell you about the time my mom bought the Sew Liberated Schoolhouse Tunic Pattern? And how my sisters, my mom and I each made a version (or two) for ourselves? We love tunics. We’re a tunic family. Whitney? She’s no different. And this little Sadie Tunic…that bicycle fabric…those little spoke buttons? To. die. for.
The Sadie Tunic in Bicycle Fabric
The facts, straight up:
Size:  2-3
Fabric: Lucy’s Crab Shack by Moda in green and solid coordinate
Notions:  Fabric button cover maker (mine’s a Dritz one)
Difficulty:  Easy
Make it again?:  Um.. possibly with the little pockets, maybe…

The Sadie Tunic with Covered Buttons
Her words:

“I’m clearly a sucker for a tunic.  This one nearly did me in though.  I figured I would have a quick little project on my hands since I was omitting the buttons on one side and the pockets entirely.  Nope. 

First, I sewed on both facings not realizing the button placket should have been sandwiched between one.  Then I realized I should have serged the facing edges so they didn’t fray.  Then I attempted to fix that problem by pinking the edges and managed to cut through the front of the tunic…  By the time I got it all put together, attempted to mask the slice in the fabric, and started working on the buttonholes, I thought I was going to throw in the towel.
 
The buttons took forever because I wanted those little wheels centered just so.  Never mind actually making the buttonholes – that was an exercise in patience because my automatic buttonhole maker sometimes doesn’t like to make the second long leg of the buttonhole as long as the first.  Grrr.
 
Do you ever have one of those days?  It was no fault of the pattern, which was easy to follow if you read the directions.  I was just not on top of my game this time.  I do think that serves as the motivation to sew it one more time – just to prove I can get it right.”